7 Up


Fizzy, cold, and refreshing. Thats probably how I would describe soft drinks. I personally love them but drinking alot would be really bad for you. So lets talk about it then!


The origins of soft drinks lie in the development of fruit-flavored drinks. In Tudor England 'water imperial' was widely drank; it was a sweetened drink with lemon flavor and containing cream of tartar. Another early type of soft drink was lemonade, made of water and lemon juice sweetened with honey, but without carbonated water. The Compagnie des Limonadiers of Paris was granted a monopoly for the sale of lemonade soft drinks in 1676. Vendors carried tanks of lemonade on their backs and dispensed cups of the soft drink to Parisians. The first marketed soft drinks (non-carbonated) appeared in the 17th century.



In 1810, the first United States patent was issued for the "means of mass manufacture of imitation mineral waters" to Simons and Rundell of Charleston, South Carolina. However, carbonated beverages did not achieve great popularity in America until 1832, when John Mathews invented his apparatus for the making carbonated water.


Over 1,500 U.S. patents were filed for either a cork, cap, or lid for the carbonated drink bottle tops during the early days of the bottling industry. Carbonated drink bottles are under a lot of pressure from the gas. Inventors were trying to find the best way to prevent the carbon dioxide or bubbles from escaping. In 1892, the "Crown Cork Bottle Seal" was patented by William Painter, a Baltimore machine shop operator. It was the first very successful method of keeping the bubbles in the bottle.